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Clinical characteristics and treatment of spontaneous chronic corneal epithelial defects (SCCEDs) with diamond burr debridement

Hung, J.H.; Leidreiter, K.; White, J.S.; Bernays, M.E.

Veterinary Ophthalmology 23(4): 764-769

2020


ISSN/ISBN: 1463-5224
PMID: 32379378
DOI: 10.1111/vop.12772
Accession: 070097924

To document the characteristics of unilateral, bilateral SCCEDs, and unilateral SCCED with a subsequent SCCED in the contralateral eye that are treated with diamond burr debridement (DBD). Medical records of canine SCCEDs who have received DBD between 2010 and 2018 were retrospectively reviewed. Signalment, eye(s) affected, procedures performed, time to detected healing, and complications were statistically analyzed. Two hundred and forty-nine dogs had unilateral SCCEDs (85.0%), 13 dogs (4.4%) had bilateral SCCEDs, and 31 dogs (10.6%) had unilateral SCCED with a subsequent SCCED in the contralateral eye, 26 of which occurred within 24 months following the unilateral SCCED. No significant differences in healing rates after one DBD were found between different presentations of SCCEDs. Boxers are 2.3 times more likely to have subsequent SCCED in their contralateral eye than non-Boxer breeds. Of the 341 SCCEDs (293 dogs) in the total study population, 252 eyes (73.9%) achieved healing after undergoing one DBD. Fifteen cases were lost to subsequent follow-up, and 58 eyes (17.0%) required additional intervention after a DBD. Complications occurred in 16 eyes (4.7%) including 13 cases of keratomalacia and three cases of anterior uveitis. Diamond burr debridement is a safe and effective treatment for different presentations of SCCEDs. No significant differences in healing rates after one DBD were found between different presentations of SCCEDs. Particularly in Boxers, a new SCCED may develop in the contralateral eye, typically within 24 months following a presentation of unilateral SCCED.

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