Effect of dietary digestible lysine concentration on performance, egg quality, and blood metabolites in laying hens

Kakhki, R. A.M.; Golian, A.; Zarghi, H.

Journal of Applied Poultry Research 25(4): 506-517

2016


ISSN/ISBN: 1056-6171
DOI: 10.3382/japr/pfw032
Accession: 070795945

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Abstract
An experiment was conducted to evaluate the effect of dietary digestible lysine concentration on productive performance, egg quality, and blood metabolites in laying hens. A completely randomized block design was performed with 5 treatments and 6 replicates of 8 Hy-line W-36 hens each, from 32 to 44 wk of age. The treatments were 5 digestible lysine concentrations (0.657, 0.707, 0.757, 0.807, and 0.857% of diet). Feed intake was significantly increased with each increment in dietary digestible lysine concentration. Significant improvement in egg production, egg weight, egg mass, Haugh unit, and FCR were observed by an increase in lysine intake. Dietary lysine concentration did not have a significant impact on percentage of egg components, specific gravity, eggshell thickness, DM, and protein constituents of eggs. Dietary digestible lysine concentration did not have a significant effect on triglyceride, cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein (HDL), low-density lipoprotein (LDL), uric acid, and total protein in plasma. The digestible lysine requirements for optimal egg production, egg mass, and egg weight (32 to 44 wk of age), based on the linear broken-line regression analysis, were 814, 810 and 778 (mg/b/d), respectively. Whereas, these values were 4, 3.9, and 6 percent less than those estimated by the quadratic broken-line model, respectively.